2020-12-31-2967 - Radiation Epidemiology for Public Health Decision Making - CDC/ NCEH - Emergency Management, Radiation and Chemical Branch, Division of Environmental Health Science and Practice, ( 2020-12-31 - 2023-12-31 )

ID Number
2020-12-31-2967
Course Title
Radiation Epidemiology for Public Health Decision Making
Sponsor
CDC/ NCEH - Emergency Management, Radiation and Chemical Branch, Division of Environmental Health Science and Practice,
Credits
2
Valid from/to
-
Description
Epidemiologic studies help shape public health policy and evidence-based health practices by identifying, quantifying, and understanding health risks of exposure in defined populations. Radiation epidemiology is no exception. Although radiation epidemiologists have studied health effects of radiation exposure for over a century, health effects of exposure to very low doses of radiation or radiation delivered at low dose rates (i.e., the kinds of radiation exposure human populations primarily receive in their lives) remain equivocal and at times controversial. This is partly due to a myriad of published studies with seemingly contradicting conclusions. The training will provide an overview of important considerations of radiation epidemiology, will describe what distinguishes a well-designed or reliable study from an unreliable, and a flawed study, and will explore how the results of epidemiologic studies are misused or misrepresented and the impact on creating public health policy and evidence-based health practices.

Website: https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/radiation/emergencies/radiation-epidemiology.htm

OBJECTIVES:

At the conclusion of Radiation Epidemiology for Public Health Decision Making, the participant will be able to:

Define radiation epidemiology.
Explain how correct interpretation of radiation epidemiologic studies help shape public health policy and evidence-based health practices.
List three characteristics that constitute a well-designed radiation epidemiology study using science-based explanations.
Identify one characteristic that constitutes an unreliable radiation epidemiology study using science-based explanations.
Identify one way that a radiation epidemiology study could become flawed using science-based explanations.
Describe one way that the results of a radiation epidemiology study could be misused or misrepresented using science-based explanations.
Describe one way that this educational activity will improve my contribution as a team member.
CEU credit type
Group A-Formal Educational Activities
CEU credit sub-type
A - Short course related to the practice of health physics